Fishers reel in their catches at the 2nd annual special-needs fishing rodeo on June 28. The event saw more than 40 participants.
Fishers reel in their catches at the 2nd annual special-needs fishing rodeo on June 28. The event saw more than 40 participants.

Archived Story

MCDAB hosts 2nd annual special-needs fishing rodeo

Published 12:40pm Monday, June 30, 2014

By Nick Sellers | Staff Reporter

For the second year in a row, individuals with any manner of physical or intellectual disabilities were treated to the fishy fares of the pond at Dublin Park for the special-needs fishing rodeo presented by Madison City Disability Advocacy Board on June 28.

More than 40 participants turned out for the morning event, which MCDAB chairman Keith Bedsole said was an increase of around 10 from last year’s inaugural rodeo.

The increased turnout wasn’t the thing that made this year’s event more successful, however.

“We had a lesson learned from last year that the hooks we’re using that were donated were way too big,” Bedsole said. “So we resized the hooks and these guys are catching lots of fish. There are smiles all around the whole pond. It’s awesome.”

Madison City Councilman Tim Holcombe attended a portion of the event, as did Mayor Troy Trulock and his wife, Dana. Trulock reportedly gave a short speech before the reeling began.

“We’ve had more interest from the community at the highest level – like individuals from the city government – so that made it worth it as well,” Bedsole said.

Participants fished from 10:30 a.m. until a little before noon, at which point everyone involved received drinks and snacks while they waited for award winners to be announced.

Trophies were given out to one male and one female in the first fish caught, most fish caught and largest fish caught categories. All fishers received a certificate of participation.

MCDAB receives annual appropriations from the City Council and are represented on the council by District 6 councilman Gerald Clark.

“When you get the word out about what we’re trying to get across, people in our community are showing interest,” Bedsole said.

 

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